Testicular Cancer Awareness and Its Effect on Your Body


While April may be a month to celebrate spring and the warmer weather that comes with it, it’s also Testicular Cancer Awareness month. Each year, over 9,000 men ages 15-44 are diagnosed with this disease and are faced with deciding on a treatment plan, as well as working through the impact it has on their lives. The good news is, if caught in time and treated rapidly, testicular cancer has a 97% survival rate. Although this is a great number, the best way to avoid this disease is to be preventative.

Throughout history, studies have been conducted attempting to link wearing tight underwear to Testicular Cancer. While we cannot confirm that is true, we will say our premium Silk Cut Boxer Briefs are both comfortable AND breathable. That said, we value men’s health and want to share with you some insight and an infographic to help answer some questions on Testicular Cancer and the effects it has on your body.

Sex Life

The diagnosis of Testicular Cancer may cause you to feel many emotions. Fear, anxiety, and even anger are all natural reactions to finding out you have a disease that may temporarily change your life. These feelings can also cause a decrease in your desire to engage in sexual activity. This is completely normal and for most, only a temporary feeling. If you are undergoing chemotherapy or radiation, it’s also standard to have a lower libido, as your body is fatigued. However, if you’ve fully recovered and are still experiencing low sex drive or even erectile dysfunction, consult with your doctor in order to discuss treatment options to overcome these issues and get your sexual health back in check.

Fertility

While treatment for testicular cancer typically involves the removal of one or both testicles, the risk of becoming infertile as a result is always looming in the background. However, if you only have one testicle removed, your chances of conceiving children may not be affected. That said, some men are faced with undergoing chemotherapy or radiation, both of which can temporarily damage sperm. Regardless of your diagnosis or treatment plan, it’s recommended you take the necessary measures to preserve your sperm prior to undergoing any surgeries or course of action if you have plans for a family in the future. Once you’ve made a full recovery and you’ve had the go ahead from your doctor, it’s completely fine to resume sexual activity.

Post-Cancer

Life post testicular cancer is much like living life after any illness. Again, depending on the stage at which you are diagnosed, once you’re in remission, life can resume in a normal fashion. The most commonly reported long term side-effect of this type of cancer is lung problems. Patients who are being treated for cancer are often given Bleomycin, which in high doses can cause lung scarring. Additionally, if you’re a smoker, it’s wise to stop for your health, but even more so to reduce the damage to your lungs. Aside from that, it’s recommended that you visit your doctor regularly for check ups and perform testicular self-checks between visits.